Presume Permission

Presume Permission

The New Work Manifesto is grounded in trust. We’ve all accepted all of the ways that we’ve added to work in the last ten years but most of us have been scared to ask for any flexibility in return. The New Work Manifesto is grounded in trust. We’ve all accepted all of the ways that we’ve added to work in the last ten years but most of us have been scared to ask for any flexibility in return.

The New Work Manifesto says we should assume permission for flexibility. Quite often we all find ourselves in a dilemma. “Yes I know we don’t do work from home but can I go home in this instance to get this presentation finished?”, “Is it okay if I leave early to go my evening class on Wednesdays, I always make up the time”.

Trust is given – and we’ll work to sustain and earn it with our actions.

People find they do their best work in different ways. Leaders’ roles are to support workers achieving results in the way best suited to them.

Netflix’s culture document is one of the many attempts of big firms to try to ensure that people feel the freedom to get their job done in the best way possible. 

Of course there are some facts that are worth considering. Ben Waber’s research has found that people working from home actually leads to lower productivity, so getting into a state where we all work alone at the kitchen tables isn’t good for our companies or our sense of team but allowing us to find a way to adapt our working practices about the way we work best is probably a good thing.

 

The author Tony Schwartz suggests that we should think of our energy (and our concentration) as coming in ‘bursts’. None of us operate at our best trying to work at full power all the time. If we can recognise this then taking walks, taking breaks for exercise are all good ways to ensure that we get the most from the 40 hours we actually work.



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